Training to lower heart rate

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JonT
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Training to lower heart rate

Post by JonT »

I am looking for some advice and some pointers.

I am pleased with my recent training (mostly 30-45 minute sessions at r18-22) and the impact it is having on shorter and longer rows - a 1min, 1K and HM PB already this season after none for the last 5 years. But my HR rises very quickly when I row and so I end up doing almost all distances and the vast majority of my training in TR band, or AT if I am really lucky. This isn't enjoyable, certainly isn't sustainable and possibly isn't very wise. My current bands are:

Your UT2 band is a heart rate of 129 bpm to 149 bpm with a mean of 139 bpm.
Your UT1 band is a heart rate of 150 bpm to 162 bpm with a mean of 156 bpm.
Your AT band is a heart rate of 163 bpm to 169 bpm with a mean of 166 bpm.
Your TR band is a heart rate of 170 bpm to 182 bpm with a mean of 176 bpm.
Your AN band is a heart rate of 183 bpm to 189 bpm with a mean of 186 bpm.
Your 70% heart rate is 149 bpm.
Your 85% heart rate is 169 bpm.

So I am looking to increase my focus on maintaining performance while reducing heart rates. I imagine the solution is to row 30-60 minute pieces while trying to keep the HR in UT2/UT1 territory. But it is all a bit vague at the moment in terms of my plans. Any recommended approaches or websites or articles?

Thanks
54 years old, 5"10', clinging on to 75kg and frustratingly but understandably inconsistent
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Wolfmiester
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Re: Training to lower heart rate

Post by Wolfmiester »

Hi Jon,
Just noticed your query ...
Not surprisingly you are spot on with regard to the training solution, longer rows in the lower categories.
I found this year that rowing in front of the tv helps for that!
In terms of articles, I have no idea I'm afraid.
But in terms of a plan, the Marathon plan wouldn't be a bad place to start?
Wolfie

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MaxMacLaren1
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Re: Training to lower heart rate

Post by MaxMacLaren1 »

Hi Jon,

Great question. To add to Wolfie's reply I read a book last year "Heart rate training for the compleat idiot" by Parker. Unfortunately it isn't in print now and I gave my copy away. It was very much about polarised training but the main thing thing I remember is slow down. So stay in the band you want to be no matter how slow you feel you're going.

I think it was Author Lydiard who popularised this type of training. If you Google Lydiard training you'll see loads of ideas. It's running related but I assume the heart rate / fitness principles are the same.
Max

Male, 53yrs, 83kg, 181cm
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JonT
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Re: Training to lower heart rate

Post by JonT »

Thanks for the replies guys. I'll have a dig around on the web. I've started on the training, doing 3x13min r2 @ 20spm. It's quite novel not to be copmpletely spent at the end of a session. Keeping the HR capped was a challenge though.

I can't do this in front of the tv because the ergo is in the garden at the moment while the builders decide whether to come back or not #-o

I came across this site last week and found an interesting extract (NB - the assumption is you are training 5-6 days each week!):
Steady State Training (3/4+ per week)

These workouts consist of long periods of training and provide the base for your high-performance efforts. I suggest three of four training sessions but it is generally best to make about 80% of your minutes each week this low-intensity UT1 and UT2 effort.

The ideal heart rate for these kinds of workouts falls in the 55% to 80% of max heart rate (or you can use the formula below which outputs a number higher than just (Max heart rate x 0.70, for 70% of max). It is also worth noting that where these zones begin and end are NOT hard lines. However, we use these zones so that the athlete has some kind of metric to watch to gauge how much effort they are putting for a given training piece.

I would recommend wearing a heart rate monitor to ensure that you are training in the correct zone. It is important that you hit these zones so that you don’t fall into the trap of overtraining. The actual target heart rate that you would need depends on your age.

When you are doing a steady-state workout, you should get your heart rate into the 55% to 80% of max and stay in that zone for 30-80 minutes. For example, If you are rowing a UT2 piece then your target heart rate should be in that zone and not go above the top limit (even if you feel like you can go harder). Building an aerobic base takes time and part of this approach allows a sustainable pace to a long term training place that goes a long way to avoiding burnout.

Long slow distance work can be tough to do completely on the ergometer. I would recommend that some work is done on the machine (at least one-two long rows per week). However, there are other options to complete this training such as swimming and cycling.

Another good tip is to break this time up into segments. This strategy allows you to get off the rowing machine, stretch out and hydrate. I would keep the breaks to a 90-120 second interval. Therefore, instead of doing 1 x 60-minute piece with no breaks, break the work into 4 x 15 mins or 3 x 20 minutes. You could also do 6 x 10 minutes if you see fit. I wouldn’t recommend rowing for less than 10 minutes in a stretch in this training zone because you won’t get the same training effect. Additionally, I wouldn’t recommend doing all of this work on the ergometer. This is especially true if you don’t have slides and you have a stationary Concept2 ergometer. A strain on the back and chronic injuries of the spine can occur with too much distance on the ergometer. Listen to your body and mix up the mode of exercise from time to time. This approach helps with both the physical and psychological aspects of training for a competitive event.

In the next section, I discuss the higher intensity training zones. The amount of minutes you should spend in these zones is about 20% of your overall time volume for the week of training. So for example, a week total volume training of 300 minutes (High and Low Intensity), should have 240 minutes of low-intensity work (UT1, UT2) and 60 minutes of high-intensity work (Anaerobic Threshold, Transportation and Anaerobic).
54 years old, 5"10', clinging on to 75kg and frustratingly but understandably inconsistent
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