PLYOMETRICS AND ROWING

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greenman
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PLYOMETRICS AND ROWING

Post by greenman » Sat Feb 16, 2008 2:53 pm

Can anyone tell me if we could use the training term plyometrics, to describe the form of work we do on the erg. As i understand it the explosive power that a rower develops is the same as that claimed for plyometrics.if that is so, then we can say,we are doing the best form of exersice. :fsgrin:
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Post by badocter » Sat Feb 16, 2008 5:14 pm

For normal distances we do not contract with maximal effort, so I don't think the label fits, but the low pull may qualify (5-10 stroke max effort). I think to refer to plyometrics as "the best form of exercise" is also not accurate. Like any exercise or sport it focuses on some dimensions of improvement more than others (in this case emphasizes anaerobic power and control, not aerobic endurance).
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Post by kirbyt » Sat Feb 16, 2008 8:22 pm

I don't think it fits either. A couple of summers ago, I was shooting hoops with my boy on our driveway basket and I was almost touching the rim--I haven't been able to touch the rim since I was 20. I figured "it must be the rowing, giving me big strong explosive quads." Yes, my head was very big for about a day. But there was something nagging at me as I stared at the rim. Got out a measuring tape and discovered it was 9'6" instead of 10'. Maybe now I can jump my puny 20" vertical for longer but it's still not much of a vertical. :roll:

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greenman
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Post by greenman » Sat Feb 16, 2008 11:36 pm

:( Ok so has anyone on here tried this form work out.I must admit its not the form of exersice that i would do,dodgy ankles,is my excuse.. :oops: Clive..
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badocter
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Post by badocter » Sun Feb 17, 2008 5:59 am

While I have not done workouts consisting exclusively of plyometrics, I did do quite a bit of martial arts training in college --Tae Kwon Do as an undergrad (had black belt ranking), and during graduate school did Aikido and fencing. Of the three, TKD had the most significant plyometric component - after all the focus is delivering the most explosive strikes, kicks and blocks as possible. The most exagerated plyometric component of MA training is prep work for breaking technique (be it wood, concrete slabs, ice blocks...). Just keep in mind that plyometrics is a part of MA training, not its entirety or even its majority -- there is a lot of emphasis is on developing endurance, micro motor skill, and hopefully strategy.

Martial arts are great exercise, and each offers its own mix of focuses - one is not better or worse than the other, they are just different. I plan to start again when my kids are a little older and we can take class together. Most MA clubs/schools have a friendly atmosphere and are always looking for new members. You would also not believe how rapid progress is made during the first 6 monthes - flexibilty, endurance, coordination.... Does any of this sound familiar? :wink:
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Re: PLYOMETRICS AND ROWING

Post by grahamcawood » Mon Nov 06, 2017 4:40 am

Greetings,
There seems to be varying opinion as to whether plyometric training will help the rower. There is also opinion that the catch does not have the fast reversal needed for plyometrics.
I believe that plyometrics would help a rower, as it does for many other of our sports or activities. But we need to train FAST REVERSALS at both ends of the stroke to make it happen. Even a slight pause will destroy it. It will probably work best at higher0213 rating - 26 plus?
So: At the catch reverse with a combination of rebound and plyometric muscle power. Drop the blade in as you start accelerating. No pause!!.
At the release do not hold the knees down. Let them finish at the SAME time as the hands, and rebound. Push the hands away quickly to clear the rising knees. While the release involves much less muscle use than the catch, if plyometrics can help, why not?
Watch Youtube 'Rhecon sculling' for this sort of stroke. Also note the 1:1 in:out ratio, arms bent until the catch, relaxed back, raised heels.
I don't think that doing 'drills' is going to help much. If you want to use plyometrics in the rowing stroke, then do so - IN THE ROWING STROKE. Do it always, so that it becomes a normal part of the stroke - ALWAYS!!
Have fun

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